My Perspective – Floatation Tank Information

Floatation Tank

Introduction Floatation Therapy:

Floatation therapy is a treatment using sensory deprivation within a floatation tank or float room. Years of well documented tests show that floatation tank therapy not only has an immediate effect on pain relief and elimination of stress, it also promotes ‘whole-brain’ thinking. Many athletes, writers and artists have experienced enormous benefits from floatation therapy utilising floatation tanks.

Perfect Relaxation is achieved in the silent warmth of the tank. Ideal for easing aches and pains or to aid in recovery from more serious injury, eg frozen shoulder, stiff neck, rugby and football injuries.

The tank is filled with warm water containing a high concentration of Epsom Salts. This means that you float and are completely supported by the water allowing every part of the body to relax, blood pressure to lower and lymphatic flow to increase. Stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline are reduced.

The tank is about the size of a double bed and has a high ceiling so you do not feel ‘closed in’. There are underwater lights if you prefer not to float in complete darkness. The float room is completely private and towels are  provided.

Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy or Sensory Deprivation is the underlying principle of floatation. The tank restricts the effects of gravity, touch, temperature, sight and sound. Freed from all external stimuli on the nervous system and sense organs, the body and mind enter a perfectly balanced state.

A Spiritual Experience:

When floaters enter the chamber, they soon leave an awareness of their bodies behind. Floaters can quickly move into a calming, meditative state, which becomes the perfect springboard for a deeper spiritual experience. Like meditation, a floating session can enhance a sense of connection to the larger world outside.

Because the water’s temperature matches that of the skin, and due to the body’s weightlessness in the tank, floaters quickly lose their sense of physical boundaries. This physical detachment opens up a world of spiritual possibility.

The deeply restorative experience also leaves floaters open to ongoing spiritual and emotional wellness after their session has ended. Think of floating like a restful night’s sleep. When you wake fully rested and energized, you’re far less likely to be irritable throughout the day, more likely to listen to others, and more likely to be sensitive to your own physical needs. All of these things come together to create a more emotionally and spiritually healthy life.

Floating offers the experience of restful sleep, multiplied. Many floaters report entering a state of mental blankness when in the tank. This gives the mind, which works creatively even when we sleep, a much-needed chance to rest. This sort of down time is essential to mental wellness. Without a break from the ongoing stress of daily life, the constant swarm of thoughts our minds produce, we wear down. After a session, many floaters feel mentally, as well as physically, rested.

It’s when we are at our most peaceful and relaxed that we are most open to spiritual awakenings. Time spent in a floatation chamber is the perfect opportunity to quiet our minds, reconnect with our inner self. Mindfulness is more than a time to recharge. It’s an opportunity to hear our inner voice sing.

  • One off floatation £40 per hour
  • One off floatation for a couple £45 per hour

New clients only

Book 3 1 hour floatation sessions £75 (payment made with first float)

We recommend having at least three floats one week apart to fully experience the benefits of floatation therapy.

For people who want to float on a regular basis why not become a float member

  • 4 hours of floatation per month £95
  • 2 hours of floatation per month £55
  • 1 hour of floatation per month £35

Payment must be made by standing order each month

No need to bring anything – towels are provided. Please remove make up

 

For All Bookings:

VLOG Session One

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My Perspective – Heres Why Eating Fish Is Killing Our Oceans

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Heres Why Eating Fish Is Killing Our Oceans:

The oceans are under siege. With pollution, climate change, and overfishing, we’re killing our oceans at an alarming rate. But overfishing is one of the biggest culprits, depleting our oceans of various species on a daily basis. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, about 32 percent of the world’s fish stocks are being exploited beyond sustainability. That’s right: Almost one-third of all the ocean’s fisheries are being overfished.

What’s scarier? In the Black and Mediterranean seas, about 59 percent of stocks are fished at unsustainable levels. Between 1970 and 2012, the number of fish and other aquatic animals dropped 49 percent primarily due to overfishing, according to a report from the World Wildlife Fund and the Zoological Society of London.

Strains on fish species also affect other marine animals searching for food. Whales, dolphins, and sharks, along with other larger fish, sometimes get caught in fishing gear. In fact, 71 whales were caught in fishing gear on the West Coast last year. Sadly, incidents like these are on the rise.

Kristen Monsell, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity, told NPR what it’s like when a whale becomes entangled in a giant fishing net:

Sometimes it can drown the whale immediately, or it can happen over weeks because they get so tired. They eventually die of exhaustion. If the gear is in their mouths, it impedes their ability to feed. It can amputate their tails or other parts of the body. And for younger whales, the gear may wrap around them, but the whale keeps growing and it cuts into their flesh.

Getting tangled in fishing nets is not the only threat to marine animals. As tuna populations decrease, more sharks are caught on longlines. Longlines, which can hold up to 1,200 hooks, catch a shark one out of every five catches. Each year, about 50 million sharks are killed as bycatch. This threat to some of the ocean’s most important creatures is creating waves. In fact, the U.S. added overfishing protections to six species of shark.

Scientists now warn that our oceans could be empty of fish by 2048. If you think farming fish is the answer, think again. Many fish raised in factory farms suffer from severe depression, often floating lifelessly in their filthy, crowded tanks. And like their wild counterparts, fish in factory farms suffer cruel fates. A Mercy For Animals investigation found fish flailing around hopelessly as they tried to avoid being skinned alive.

The truth? The most recent science shows that fish feel pain. In an interview with MFA, Dr Jonathan Balcombe, animal expert and author of What a Fish Knows: The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins, stated:

There are many scientific studies that demonstrate fish pain. For example, zebrafishes are willing to pay a cost to get pain relief. When a painkiller was dissolved in a barren, unpreferred chamber of their tank, fishes injected with a dose of painful acetic acid chose to swim there, but fishes injected with a benign solution stayed in the preferred section of the tank.

We can do something to stop the abuse of fish and depletion of our oceans. By adopting a vegan diet, we can stop contributing to all fishing industry ills: pollution, climate change, and overfishing.

 

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My Perspective – Living Consciously

Living Consciously:

Do you ever have a feeling that you’re drifting through life, and not going where you want to go? Or that you don’t know how you got where you are today?

Living consciously is about taking control of your life, about thinking about your decisions rather than making them without thought, about having a life that we want rather than settling for the one that befalls us.

As much as possible, I live my life by bringing to my consciousness what is bubbling up from my unconsciousness.

I try to clear the fog through which we often drift, to see where I’m going, to make conscious choices instead of automatic ones.

If you’re drifting through life, or feel out of control, or don’t know how you got here … deciding to live consciously could be the single most important thing you do.

How to Live Life Consciously:

It’s not something you can change overnight. Living consciously is a lifestyle, a skill, an art. It’s not something you do just once, but a habit that you can form for the rest of your life.

But it is deceptively simple: Be conscious, and think about, everything you do. Make conscious choices rather than doing things without thinkings. That’s all.

It sounds simple, but it’s amazing how few people actually do this, and it’s amazing how easy it is to live life on autopilot, and just do what we always do because that’s what we’re used to doing. And it’s easier that way, even if our lives are difficult.

It’s not easy to changes our lives, to break out of our routines, to begin to live the lives we want.

It takes willful effort, energy and constant vigilance to think about our choices … all of them.

Key Tips:

Whether you keep a journal, or make reflecting on your day part of your evening routine, or have a weekly session where you review your life or take some time away from the office to reflect on everything … it’s important that you give things some thought. Regularly.

What do you want to do in life? What is important to you? What do you want your life to be like? And how will you get there? Write it down, and keep it somewhere you will see it often, and take action.

The people we love are among the most important things in our lives if not the people we love are among the most important things in our lives, if not the only important things. You need to think about your relationships. Do you spend enough time with them? Do you show your appreciation for them? Is there a way you can improve your relationship? Do you need to forgive or apologise about anything? Are there barriers that can be removed? Communication that can be improved? Also review your relationships with others, such as co-workers.

How does what you do, what you consume, and how you live, impact the environment? How does it impact poor people in Third World countries? How does it impact the poor, the powerless, the voiceless? How does it impact your community? Your life has an impact, whether you think about it or not. Being conscious of how your decisions affect others is important.

We often buy things without really thinking about what we’re doing or what they really cost. Sure, it’s just $30 … no problem, right? But that $30 might represent several hours of your life … hours that you’ll never get back. Do you really want to spend your life earning money for trivial purchases? Is that what you want to do with your life? Worth some thought, I think. Read Your Money or Your Life for more.

Our lives are filled with stuff … our houses, our offices … and beyond just the cost of buying the stuff, this stuff takes a toll on us. The stuff in our life must be arranged, cleaned, moved, taken with us when we move … it takes up space in our life, it is visual stress. Later, we’ll have to get rid of it, sort through all of it, take the time to throw it away or recycle it or donate it. If having the stuff is not worth all of that, then get rid of it.

Until we do a time audit, and keep a log of our day, even if it’s just for one or two days, we don’t really know how we spend our time. And if we do audit our time, it can be very surprising. And if we know how we’re spending our time now, we can make conscious decisions to change how we spend our time in the future. For computer-based time tracking, try Rescue Time.

Take some time to think about what kind of person you are. What your values are. Whether you live your life according to those values. How you treat people. How you treat yourself. Think about this: what do you want people to say about you when you die? Read more: The Key to Dying Happy.

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My Perspective – The Miracle of the Self-Compassion Habit

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Perfect Beauty
Self Compassion:

Let’s hypothesize that there’s a substance that’s been irritating you and causing problems in all areas of your life: it causes you to be unhappy, to be stressed, to procrastinate, to be distracted, to be angry with people, to be dissatisfied with your life, to be overweight and unhealthy, to not exercise or eat healthy, and much more.

Horrible substance, right? Now imagine there was a salve that could ease the bad effects of this substance, and make all those other areas better.

The substance is real: it’s your suffering. We all suffer, in small and large ways, every day. And it causes all the other problems I mentioned.

The salve is also real: it’s self-compassion. Which sounds too fluffy for most people, but it’s a concrete practice that will have concrete benefits, in all areas of your life.

Let’s take a minute to explore suffering, and what would happen if you applied the salve of self-compassion.

The All-Pervasive Effects of Suffering:

We don’t always think of ourselves as suffering if we’re leading normal lives. But in fact, we’re suffering more often than we usually realise, just not necessarily suffering greatly. We suffer in small ways, and that affects our happiness, the happiness of those around us, and our actions and habits throughout the day.

Some examples:

Stress: Throughout the day, things come up to stress you out, from a new thing to add to your workload to someone criticising you to the housework not being done. This is suffering, even if it’s usually at a low level (though sometimes it can get to high levels). The salve of self-compassion would reduce this suffering, and allow you to deal with these events/situations more calmly, increasing your happiness levels throughout the day.

Frustrations: Little frustrations happen all the time, from people not doing things right to traffic being congested to not being able to figure out why software isn’t working right. This is also suffering. Self-compassion can help you calm down from the frustrations, and handle the situations appropriately. You’d be less angry when you responded, which is likely to result in better outcomes.

Anger with others: Someone has pissed you off — your kid just won’t listen, your spouse has said something critical, your boss is being a total dillweed. You’re suffering, obviously. This can result not only in unhappiness but in actions that hurt your relationship with others, your career, your marriage. Instead, apply self-compassion, and you can calm down, respond appropriately, even with compassion for the other person, who is also suffering.

Feeling bad about yourself: There are a million reasons we feel bad about ourselves, from failure to body fat to hopelessness in bad situations. This too is suffering, and it causes us to take harmful actions, like comforting ourselves with food and shopping and alcohol, not taking action, not believing in ourselves. Self-compassion eases this pain and leads not only to more helpful actions but happiness.

Feeling rushed: There’s often a feeling throughout our days that we need to rush to the next thing. Walking, we go quickly. Working, we switch constantly to the next communication, next tab, next super-urgent-can’t-wait-do-it-now task. This feeling of constant urgency is itself a source of stress. Self-compassion can ease this as well, and allow us to slow down, enjoy the moment, be happier in each moment.

Distraction: We live super-distracted lives, wasting huge parts of our day. Distraction is a symptom of suffering — we go to distraction because of fear (we’re afraid of harder tasks, of missing out, of failing) and we think distraction is comforting. In turn, distraction tends to increase suffering — we feel bad about ourselves, we procrastinate on important things and make our jobs and lives worse, etc. Self-compassion helps us see this suffering, ease it, and reduce the tendency to distraction.

Procrastination: We all procrastinate, on work, on writing our great novel, on learning a musical instrument, on exercise. Procrastination, like a distraction, is a symptom of suffering, of fear and thinking we can’t do something. Self-compassion can help with that suffering and reduce procrastination, increasing our creative output, helping us to take care of finances and work tasks and decluttering and all the things we know we really want to do but aren’t doing.

Not exercising: This is a specific form of procrastination, and so is a symptom of suffering. It also shows how procrastination can cause more suffering, as a lack of exercise leads to worse health, which leads to the stress and pain of disease. Self-compassion can help us start exercising mindfully and joyfully.

Unhealthy eating: We tend to eat unhealthy things because we are afraid of vegetables and not eating junk, and because we need to comfort ourselves from other suffering, and because we think we need the crutch of temporary pleasures. We don’t. Self-compassion eases this suffering and helps us to be OK with not eating crisps and doughnuts, with making our bodies feel better.

Lack of gratitude: Much of our lives are spent in silent complaint, or sometimes not so silent. We are so unhappy with little things in our lives, which is a form of suffering. These complaints mean we’re missing out on what’s great about our lives. Self-compassion helps us to deal with the pain of these complaints, and instead turn to the amazing things we can be grateful for, which increases our happiness with life all around us.

Lack of mindfulness: Most of our lives are spent in distraction, unmindful of the present moment. This is a form of suffering because if we weren’t suffering we could stay in the present much of the time, fully appreciate the moment as it happens. Instead, we’re thinking about the future because we’re worried about it, we’re obsessed with the past mistakes we’ve made. Self-compassion can ease these worries and obsessions, and instead practice mindfulness with each moment more often.

I could go on forever because suffering takes many forms. But you can see the pattern: self-compassion eases the pain of the suffering, reducing the bad effects and allowing us to choose more helpful ways of living.

Let’s turn to a method of self-compassion.

A Self-Compassion Method:

This is a method you can practice through a daily habit, to help with suffering in all forms:

Notice your suffering, in one of its many forms.

Turn towards the suffering, see it as it is, feel it fully, experience it mindfully and in the moment.

Accept the suffering, instead of trying to ignore it, avoid it, push it away, kill it. Accept that it’s a part of life, a part of you, but temporary.

Wish yourself happiness, wish for an end to your suffering. Give yourself a mental hug, comfort yourself.

Let go of what’s causing the suffering. Just release it, or put it aside. The cause is likely something you wish were different. Instead, appreciate things as they are. Be present with reality.

Be grateful for the reality that’s happening right now.

This is not always easy to practice, and so I recommend a daily session where you turn inward for a couple minutes and practice without the distractions of daily life. You’ll get better at the self-compassion habit with practice.

But it’s worth the practice. The salve of self-compassion can change your entire life.

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My Perspective – Approaching Life with Beginner’s Mind

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Beginners Mind:

A lot of our troubles could be solved by one simple practice.

A lot of joy could be found with the same practice.

And it is simple: practice seeing life with a beginner’s mind.

I’m stealing this of course from Zen Buddhism’s shoshin and Shunryu Suzuki’s Zen Mind Beginner’s Mind, and I’ve written about it numerous times. But it’s more fundamental than most people realise.

It’s not just something you practice when you’re learning something — though dropping the “expert’s mind” and seeing the learning as a beginner is an important practice in learning. It’s something you can practice every single moment of the day (if you can remember to do so).

What is beginner’s mind? It’s dropping our expectations and preconceived ideas about something and seeing things with an open mind, fresh eyes, just like a beginner. If you’ve ever learned something new, you can remember what that’s like: you’re probably confused, because you don’t know how to do whatever you’re learning, but you’re also looking at everything as if it’s brand new, perhaps with curiosity and wonder. That’s beginner’s mind.

But imagine if you could apply this to every activity. Take eating breakfast, for example:

  • You start by seeing the activity of eating with fresh eyes as if you don’t know what to expect as if you hadn’t done it thousands of times already.
  • You really look at the food, the bowl, the spoon, and try to see the details that you might not normally notice.
  • You truly notice the textures, tastes, smells, sights of the food, pay close attention as if you don’t already know how the food will taste. Everything seems new, perhaps even full of wonder.
  • You don’t take anything for granted and appreciate every bite as a gift. It’s temporary, fleeting, and precious.

As you can see, this practice of beginner’s mind transforms the activity.

Why It Matters:

When you practice beginner’s mind with an activity:

Better experiences: You aren’t clouded by prejudgments, preconceptions, fantasies about what it should be or assumptions about how you already know it will be. When you don’t have these, you can’t be disappointed or frustrated by the experience, because there’s no fantasy or preconception to compare it to.

Better relationships: If you are talking to someone else, instead of being frustrated by them because they aren’t meeting your ideal, you can see them with fresh eyes and notice that they’re just trying to be happy, that they have good intentions (even if they’re not your intentions), and they are struggling just like you are. This transforms your relationship with the person.

Less procrastination: If you’re procrastinating on a big work task, you could look at it with beginner’s mind and instead of worrying about how hard the task will be or how you might fail at it … you can be curious about what the task will be like. You can notice the details of doing the task, instead of trying to get away from them.

Less anxiety: If you have an upcoming event or meeting that you’re anxious about … instead of worrying about what might happen, you can open yourself up to being curious about what will happen, let go of your preconceived ideas about the outcome and instead embrace not knowing, embrace being present and finding gratitude in the moment for what you’re doing and who you’re meeting.

As you can see, the practice of beginner’s mind can transform any activity, get rid of a lot of our difficulties, allow us to be more flexible, open, curious, grateful, present.

I’m not saying all of this happens automatically. It takes practice, but it’s worth the practice.

How to Practice:

Beginner’s mind is what we practice in meditation. Instead of sitting in meditation and thinking you know what your breath will be like, or the present moment in front of you will be like … you pay attention. See it with fresh eyes. Drop your preconceived ideas and just look clearly at what’s in front of you.

A daily meditation practice is extremely useful in developing this beginner’s mind. Here’s how to practice:

  • Sit comfortably and upright in a quiet place.
  • Pay attention to your body, then your breath, trying to see them clearly and freshly.
  • When you notice yourself having preconceived ideas, wandering from the present moment, thinking you know how it will be … just notice that.
  • See if you can drop the ideas and thoughts and fantasies and stories that are filling up your head. Empty yourself so you can see what’s actually in front of you. See what your breath is actually like, right now, instead of what you think it will be or what you’re thinking about.

Repeat the last few steps, over and over. See the thoughts and fantasies, empty yourself and see what’s actually there with fresh eyes.

You can practice this right now, with whatever is in front of you. With how your body feels, how your breath feels, whatever else is around you.

You can practice whenever you do any activity, from brushing your teeth to washing the dishes to walking and driving and working out and using your phone.

You can practice whenever you talk to another human being, dropping your ideas of how they should be and instead empty your mind and seeing them as they are. Notice their good heart, their difficulties, and be grateful for them as they are. Love them for who they are and find compassion for their struggles.

This is the practice. Do it with a smile, and with love, with fresh eyes and gratitude for the only universe, we’ll ever get — the actual one in front of us.

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My Perspective – Slow Down … to Enjoy Life

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Slow Down:

I don’t usually read forwarded email, but I received one today that caught my attention. It was written by someone who works at Volvo in Sweden, and he mentions how any project in the company “takes 2 years to be finalised, even if the idea is simple and brilliant. It’s a rule.”

Apparently, the fast-paced global corporate world focused on immediate results, “contrasts greatly with the slow movements of the Swedish. They, on the other hand, debate, debate, debate, hold x quantity of meetings and work with a slowdown scheme. At the end, this always yields better results.”

He relates the following story:

The first time I was in Sweden, one of my colleagues picked me up at the hotel every morning. It was September, bit cold and snowy. We would arrive early at the company and he would park far away from the entrance (2000 employees drive their car to work). The first day, I didn’t say anything, either the second or third. One morning I asked, “Do you have a fixed parking space? I’ve noticed we park far from the entrance even when there are no other cars in the lot.” To which he replied, “Since we’re here early we’ll have time to walk, and whoever gets in late will be late and need a place closer to the door. Don’t you think? Imagine my face.

He goes on to talk about a movement in Europe named Slow Food, which “establishes that people should eat and drink slowly, with enough time to taste their food, spend time with the family, friends, without rushing. Slow Food is against its counterpart: the spirit of Fast Food and what it stands for as a lifestyle.”

I love this idea. It is what is at the heart of the simplicity movement, as well as those who are trying to live frugal lives. It’s not just a matter of reducing clutter or saving money … it’s a matter of slowing down to enjoy life more, of savouring life’s simple pleasures, of rejecting on some level the materialistic culture we are all caught up in and embracing fellow humans instead. It is about changing our values and priorities.

He goes on:

Basically, the movement questions the sense of “hurry” and “craziness” generated by globalisation, fueled by the desire of “having in quantity” (life status) versus “having with quality”, “life quality” or the “quality of being”. French people, even though they work 35 hours per week, are more productive than Americans or British. Germans have established 28.8-hour workweeks and have seen their productivity been driven up by 20%. This slow attitude has brought forth the US’s attention, pupils of the fast and the “do it now!”.

This no-rush attitude doesn’t represent doing less or having a lower productivity. It means working and doing things with greater quality, productivity, perfection, with attention to detail and less stress. It means reestablishing family values, friends, free and leisure time. Taking the “now”, present and concrete, versus the “global”, undefined and anonymous. It means taking humans’ essential values, the simplicity of living.

It stands for a less coercive work environment, more happy, lighter and more productive where humans enjoy doing what they know best how to do. It’s time to stop and think about how companies need to develop serious quality with no-rush that will increase productivity and the quality of products and services, without losing the essence of spirit.

Many of us live our lives running behind time, but we only reach it when we die of a heart attack or in a car accident rushing to be on time. Others are so anxious about living the future that they forget to live the present, which is the only time that truly exists. We all have equal time throughout the world. No one has more or less. The difference lies in how each one of us does with our time. We need to live each moment. As John Lennon said, “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans”.

I found a cool site called Slow Down Now that offers some tips for slowing down, including:

  • Have a cup of tea, put your feet up and stare out of the window. Warning: don’t try this while driving.
  • Spend some quality time in the bathtub.
  • Write down these words and place them where you can see them, “Multitasking is a Moral Weakness.”
  • Try to do only one thing at a time.

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My Perspective – Finding Stillness

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The Answer I’ve Found Is Finding Stillness:

I’ve heard from many people who say, “I think too much,” or “I can’t get out of my own head.”

This is pretty common. Thinking isn’t the problem, but the struggle comes when we’re constantly spinning stories in our heads and getting caught up in them.

Our minds jump from one thing to another, seeking distraction or avoiding difficulty. We can’t focus, we can’t be present in the moment, and we feel the need to be constantly busy.

Our mental processes — jumping around and distraction and being caught up in stories — don’t have to cause anxiety, actually. They’re not only common, I think it’s the normal human condition. If this is how our minds are most of the time, then feeling afflicted by this condition is probably going to cause us constant anxiety.

Instead, I find it more helpful to learn to:

  • be aware of these mental conditions;
  • be present with the mental pattern and stay with it; and
  • work with the condition in a mindful way.

The only way to do all of that is to start with stillness.

A Moment of Stillness:

Take a minute out of your busy day and try to do the following:

  • Sit still and look away from all devices and other activities. Just sit there, maybe with your eyes closes, maybe looking at nature or a wall.
  • Take a moment to assess your condition. How do you feel? Are you tired, anxious, frustrated, calm, happy? What state is your mind in?
  • Assess how you’ve been behaving recently (today, or just in the last hour) … have you been constantly distracted? In a state of busyness? Focused? Procrastinating? Anxious or fearful? Irritated? Feeling down?
  • Stay with these feelings for a moment, just being curious and non-judgmental about them.
  • Face each of the feelings you’re noticing, and notice the mental pattern that caused it. If you’re frustrated, are you stuck in a resentful story about someone else or your current situation? If you’re anxious, is there some desired outcome that you’re holding tightly to? If you’re feeling down, are you comparing your situation with some ideal that you don’t have?
  • Bring your attention to your body. How does it feel? What sensations can you notice in your head, neck, arms, hands, torso, hips, butt, legs, feet?
  • Can you find gratitude in this moment? Can you find love or compassion, for yourself or others?

You don’t have to do all of these things each time you sit still, but these are all things you can try doing. Pick a couple and focus on them for a minute, then next time pick a couple more. Take a few deep breaths, then give yourself permission to return to work or whatever activity you’re doing.

Cultivating Stillness:

As you can see, it just takes a minute of stillness to work with your spinning stories and other mental patterns. We can use this minute of stillness to bring less busyness and anxiety and more calmness, mindfulness and gratitude to our lives. It just takes a bit of cultivation.

Some ways to cultivate stillness in your life:

  • Set reminders to get away from technology for just a minute or two, and sit still somewhere.
  • Build time in your day for just sitting. It could be sitting meditation, or simply sitting somewhere pleasant and doing nothing.
  • Find time for disconnected reading — using a paper book or dedicated ebook reader.
  • Have tea in the morning or afternoon. Just sit and drink tea, noticing its smell, flavor, warmth.
  • Do a couple yoga poses — child’s pose for a minute or two, for example, or downward facing dog or pigeon’s pose. This can be a meditation, where you’re staying with your breath and body for a couple minutes and getting a stretch in as well.
  • Go for a walk. While this isn’t technically stillness, it’s moving your body in a healthy way while not allowing yourself to be distracted.

When you notice your mind racing, when you notice distractions and procrastination, when you notice anxiety or resentment … take a stillness break.

And in this stillness, notice all of the wonders of life that we take for granted.

“Let us be silent, that we may hear the whispers of the gods.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

By Leo Babauta

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